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United States Water and Wastewater Treatment Opportunities Analysis - Midwest Regional Analysis
Deliverable Type: Market Engineering Research
Date Published: 30 Jun 2008
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Greater Funding and Planning to Fortify Midwest States Water and Wastewater Treatment Market in the United States

The comparatively abundant supply of water from the Great Lakes to the Grand Midwest states of the United States has provided reliable drinking water at competitive rates, while creating opportunities for sustainable use. Greater funding, planning, and engineering will ensure that these water services continue to be offered and the wastewater collection is conducted in an environment-friendly manner. The Midwest states can ensure reliable service and formulate long-term plans once they find solutions to infrastructure challenges, separation of combined sewers, and technology implementation initiatives. The Crypto outbreak of 1993 reminded many utilities that they need to constantly monitor municipal water services. "Investing in technologies will allow the Midwest states to rest assured that the majority of the surface water being used is safe for long-term use," says the analyst of this research. "In addition, technologies will allow for money savings and increased efficiencies."

Meanwhile, in the wastewater segment, the antiquated combined sewers in the Midwest are posing an environment hazard. Frequent sewer overflows, especially during storms, have severely affected drinking water supplies, the aquatic ecosystem, and public health. In fact, many of Ohio’s major permitted facilities violate the Clean Water Act, which implies that many of the state’s waterways are not considered ‘fishable and swimmable’. It is not just the industrial discharges that are to blame but also the municipal discharges and wet weather.

The issues related to wet weather can be resolved to a large extent, as has been proved in Michigan. "In this state, construction of a wet weather flow treatment facility (WWFTF) – to be operated during wet-weather periods to treat peak wet-weather flows or captured combined sewer overflows – is under consideration," notes the analyst. "Even though pricey, the benefit of such a facility will reduce effluent loadings to receiving streams, thereby maintaining both regulatory and environmental/aesthetic standards."

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