Frost & Sullivan Research Service   Published: 9 May 2005
U.S. Tactical Military Communications Markets
  SERVICE HOMEPAGE
RESEARCH OVERVIEW BENEFITS OF THIS SERVICE MARKET SECTORS
TECHNOLOGIES LIST OF FIGURES TABLE OF CONTENTS
ORDERING INFORMATION FURTHER INFORMATION
   Research Overview
 

Immature Technologies

Some transformational communications technologies that are urgently needed are not ready for application. Tactical satellite communications, ad hoc mobile networks, SDR radio waveforms, multilayered access and security, bandwidth utilization, and long lasting, lightweight power supplies are a few technologies that need to mature further before leaps in progress can be made.

Replace and Upgrade Worn Out Equipment

Communication equipment is being used for current operations and is being worn out before anticipated service life is reached.  Emergency buys of tacticalcommunications gear have become commonplace.  Units in the field routinely acquire waivers to purchase radios, and if they can not obtain one, they use their discretionary budget to buy the needed equipment without waiting for official acquisition channels. Large contracts have been awarded to purchase more of current communication equipment that was expected to last a few more years. These manufacturers have also been successful in selling upgraded versions that are interoperable with older gear and are expected to be interoperable with the next generation of equipment.

Partner with Lead Systems Integrators and the Government

Lead systems integrators have taken over most of the project management responsibility from the government, they are in need of niche technologies and innovative solutions to meet project goals. The interoperability goal  will be reached quicker if industry continues to emphasize the project team  concept. For example, the formation of the Network Centric Operations Industry Consortium (NCOIC) has helped to establish standards and common technology goals that contribute to interoperability requirements.  Growing small businesses that can no longer qualify as an 8(a) small business can gain government contracts by teaming with other small and midtier companies to get an edge on government contracts.

   Benefits of this Service
 

Software Defined Radio Market Opportunities

The Army and Marines have a tactical radio problem.  Current systems are dying at an alarming rate due to end of service life and intense operation that speeds normal attrition.  JTRS, the DoD solution, is not yet available, and program schedules and funding have been delayed.  The increasing capability gap is being filled by replacing and upgrading current radios such as SINCGARS, buying interim radios with software defined radio capability such as the PRC-150 and PRC-117, and by  emphasizing development of JTRS cluster 2 and 5 networking. Unofficially, troops, parents, and patriotic groups buy sets of walkie talkies at electronics stores for utilization in theater. Troops under fire are not waiting for formal doctrine, tactics, techniques, and procedures to be developed to solve a problem that they immediately face. The resulting gap between current equipment and the budgetary and technological timeline for the next generation of software defined radio presents a unique opportunity for firms to provide interim tactical radio solutions. Some examples are: Multiband Intra-team Radio (MBITR), the Falcon II series, High Frequency Manpack Radio (HFMR), Multiband Multimode Radio (MBMMR) Enhanced Position Location reporting System (EPLRS), Personal Role Radio (PRR) Integrated Intra-Team Radio (IITR).

Vehicle Radio Market Opportunities

A wide variety of legacy radios are used in ground vehicles, ships and aircraft.  SINCGARS replacements and upgrades for ground vehicles are the primary current production spending.  Army after action reports have criticized the Stryker vehicle Near Term Digital Radio (NTDR) developed in 1996, noting a slow data rate and unreliable antenna mountings.  These and similar problems call for intermediate solutions until JTRS Cluster 1 and JTRS AMF Clusters  meet the DoD goal of interoperability across all tactical communications platforms.  Cluster 1 provides communications for Army helicopters, Army and Marine ground vehicles, and Air Force Tactical Control Party.  The program has made considerable progress but faces several challenges such as information security certification.  The vehicular JTRS will provide integrated data, video, and voice with sufficient channels and waveforms to support command post operations and connect to local area networks. 

Datalink Market Opportunities

In order to reach the goal of NCW, various airborne and ground data links, terminals, and platforms they reside on need to be expanded and improved. Intelligence information will be fused and machine processed so situational awareness is increased, decisions made, the results sent out, and the process repeats itself. The DoD transition plan to NCW calls for Internet Protocol (IP) networks in the battlespace with redundant common datalinks and other communication channels that will support Tactical Targeting Network, Wideband Network Waveform, Link 22, Variable Message Formats, Common  Datalinks, Joint Range Extension  Application Protocol (JREAP) Integrated Broadcast Services (IBS), and JTRS programs. This translation to IP coding is the critical interoperability hurdle and is a challenge for the industry, since IP will provide the flexible standard usable by all other programs and applications. The   Joint Datalink Information Combat Execution Program has begun to develop, test, evaluate, and institutionalize joint service Tactics, Techniques and  Procedures (TTP) that will provide mission information across multiplatform  tactical datalinks in the air and on the ground.

Satellite Communications Market Opportunities

The DoD has recognized the necessity to speedup innovative solutions and to make commercial SATCOM access more efficient. The Army's Program Manager for Defense Communications and Army Transmission Systems (PM DCATS) has developed the World Wide Satellite Systems Program (WWSS) to make the procurement of satellite communications systems and services more responsive and cost-effective. As the DoD's demand for satellite terminals and services increases, Combat Service Support Satellite Communication (CSS SATCOM) contracts allow the fast procurement of terminals to satisfy real requirements. Rapid response contracts awarded by the WWSS program will also help in the near future when commercial X and Ka band satellite systems become more available for military applications. It is hoped that WWSS can help the DoD move away from the current ad hoc contracting approach to each requirement as it emerges, and increase timely support to the troops by establishing partnerships with a number of qualified contractors.

Tactical Networks Market Opportunities

The focus today and for the next few years is on the needs of ground forces at the squad and at individual soldier levels. The continued lack of over the horizon mobile communications and sufficient bandwidth to move blue force tracking and enemy target data and imagery to soldiers and Marines in contact with the enemy is a problem that the DoD intends to correct as soon as possible. In 2004, approximately two-thirds of new funding was allotted for ground forces tactical networks. The major effort to accomplish this is the Army WIN-T program, but in the meantime, the Army and Marine Corps have deployed interim networks such as the joint network node, and continue to "spiral" new technologies into current networks while simultaneously working through the traditional acquisition cycle for WIN-T, due out in 2008. The services in some cases are fielding systems months and even years earlier than they had planned to respond to immediate needs.

   Market Sectors
 

Expert Frost & Sullivan analysts thoroughly examine the following market sectors in this research:

  • Communications and IT
  • Electronics and Semiconductors
  • Environment and Energy
  • Healthcare
  • Industrial
  • Transportation
   Technologies
 

The following technologies are covered in this research:

  • Software Defined Radio is a radio that can be loaded with software so it is interoperable with other radios.
  • Datalinks are steady radio streams that transmit data very quickly, often used for photo and video images.
  • Mobile over the horizon networks allow forces that are dispersed over long distances to maintain contact with each while on the move.
  • Multilayered access and security allow users at different levels to use the same information source.
  Table Of Contents

 U.S. Tactical Military Communications Markets

1. Executive Summary
     1. The U.S. Tactical Military Communications Market
        1. Overview
        2. Summary of Major Findings

2. Research Methodology
     1. Research Scope
        1. Objectives and Purposes
        2. Market Engineering Research Methodology

3. Industry Challenges & Strategies and Awards
     1. Market Challenges
       1. Industry Challenges
     2. Company Strategies
       1. Strategic Recommendations
     3. Frost & Sullivan Awards
        1. Frost & Sullivan Awards
        2. 2005 Frost & Sullivan Market Leadership Award
        3. 2005 Frost & Sullivan Growth Strategy Leadership Award
        4. 2005 Frost & Sullivan Competitive Strategy Leadership Award
        5. 2005 Frost & Sullivan Technology Leadership Award
        6. 2005 Frost & Sullivan Product Innovation Award

4. Total U.S. Tactical Military Communications Market
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Drivers and Restraints
        1. Market Drivers
        2. Market Restraints
     3. Market Forecasts and Analysis
        1. Funding Forecasts
        2. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

5. Individual Radios
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Analysis
        1. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

6. Squad Radios
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Analysis
        1. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

7. Vehicle Radios and Intercoms
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Analysis
        1. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

8. Datalinks
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Analysis
        1. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

9. SATCOM
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Analysis
        1. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

10. Networks
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Analysis
        1. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

11. Power Supplies
     1. Market Profile
        1. Overview
     2. Market Analysis
        1. Technology Applications and Market Analysis

12. Database of Market Participants
     1. Database of Key Industry Participants
        1. Key Industry Participants

13. List of Acronyms and Decision Support Databases
     1. List of Acronyms
        1. Terms and Definitions
     2. Canadian Tactical Communications Supplement
        1. Canada
     3. Decision Support Databases (DSDs)
        1. DSD I
        2. DSD II
        3. DSD III
        4. DSD IV



   List of Figures
 
  • Figure 1-1 shows the revenue forecasts for the U.S. tactical military communications market from 2004 to 2010.
  • Figure 3-1 outlines the impact of the top challenges for the U.S. tactical military communications industry and their impact throughout the forecast period 2005-2010.
  • Figure 3-2 outlines some top industry strategies for the U.S. tactical military communications market. 2005-2010.
  • Figure 4-1 identifies drivers ranked in order of impact for the U.S. tactical military communications market from 2005 to 2010.
  • Figure 4-2 identifies restraints ranked in order of impact for the U.S. tactical military communications market from 2005 to 2010.
  • Figure 4-3 presents the funding forecasts for the U.S. tactical military communications market RDT&E and Procurement 2004-2010
  • Figure 4-4 shows the U.S. tactical military communications market funding forecast by market segment. 2004-2010.
  • Figure 4-5 shows the U.S. tactical military communications market funding forecast by military service. 2004-2010
  • Figure 4-6 shows the competitive structure of the tactical military communications market. 2004.
  • Figure 4-7 indicates some of the industry participants by product type 2004.
    Chapter 5
  • Figure 5-1 lists some recent U.S. tactical military communications/individual radios market major contracts, 2005.
  • Figure 5-2 is the U.S. tactical military communications/individual radios funding forecast by service, 2004-2010.
  • Figure 6-1 lists some recent U.S. tactical military communications/squad radios major contracts, 2005.
  • Figure 6-2 is the  U.S. tactical military communications/squad radios funding forecast by service, 2004-2010.
  • Figure 7-1 lists some recent U.S. tactical military communications/vehicle radios and intercoms major contracts, 2005.
  • Figure 7-2 is the U.S. tactical military communications/vehicle radios and intercoms funding forecast by service, 2004-2010.
  • Figure 8-1 lists some recent U.S. tactical military communications datalink contracts 2005
  • Figure 8-2 is the U.S. tactical military communications datalinks funding forecast by service, 2004-2010.
  • Figure 9-1 lists some recent U.S. tactical military communications SATCOM contracts, 2005.
  • Figure 9-2 is the U.S. tactical military communications SATCOM funding forecast by service, 2004-2010.
  • Figure 10-1 lists some recent U.S. tactical military communications networks contracts, 2005.
  • Figure 10-2 is the U.S. tactical military communications networks funding forecast by service, 2004-2010.
  • Figure 11-1 lists some recent U.S. tactical military communications antennas contracts, 2005.
  • Figure 11-2 is the U.S. tactical military communications antennas funding forecast by service, 2004-2010.

 


 

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