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Vikrant Gandhi - Analyst Profile

Industry Director
Frost & Sullivan
Information & Communication Technologies

Summary

Functional Expertise

Fifteen years of product marketing, research, and consulting experience, which includes supporting clients’ needs through more than 150 syndicated market research deliverables and consulting assignments. Particular expertise in:

-Assessing next-generation digital transformation trends, technologies and market dynamics
-Helping clients develop and execute their go-to-market strategies
-Providing continuous inputs to clients into new market developments and helping them understand the strategic implications

Industry Expertise

Experience base covering broad range of sectors, leveraging long-standing working relationships with senior executives in
-Internet of Things market
-Cybersecurity market
-Digital advertising market
-Integrated financial services market
-Enterprise mobility management market
-Next-generation wireless network infrastructure and services market

What I Bring to the Team

-Strong technical background, along with real-world experience of the mobile communications business
-Exceptional data modeling and forecasting abilities
-Strong analytical skills

Career Highlights

Extensive expertise in mobile communications operations and research business
-Reliance Telecom, India
-Frost & Sullivan, India
-Frost & Sullivan, U.S.A.

Education

-MBA in Telecom Management
-Degree in Engineering
-Cisco Certified Network Associate certification
-Sun Certified Java Professional certification

Areas of expertise
CORPORATE STRATEGY
MARKET RESEARCH
COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE


Recent items from Vikrant Gandhi

Real Time Cybersecurity Monitoring is Essential for IoT Cybersecurity
In an era of digitization, cybersecurity implementations must fundamentally transform to deliver protection in enterprise networks that have become increasingly perimeter-less and more exposed to cyber-threats. Threat monitoring and assessment solutions cannot afford to ignore any given device type, network segment, or workload in order to adequately protect the enterprise network. However, the reality is that unknown assets and unmanaged networks are still discovered in enterprise networks monitored by vulnerability scanners and solutions. In fact, cyber-criminals have successfully used ‘leak paths’, such as those left open by contractors, to illegally obtain sensitive information or to disrupt network operations, even in networks that have deployed IT security solutions. The problem is not only the ’visibility gap’. Quite often, the isolation that exists between the various security tools and solutions must be removed in order to increase threat detection and response capabilities. For example, a lack of data normalization between cybersecurity tools and solutions can create inefficiencies in intrusion detection and response (IDR) operations. As the walls come down between IT and IoT networks, the exchange of IP-enabled traffic can lead to the ‘bleed-over’ of malware from the IT environment to the OT environment. Integration of the IoT with enterprise IT creates additional challenges, including: 1) Monitoring and securing the large volume of digital traffic generated by IoT systems; 2) Malware-centric security approach is rendered ineffective as attacks on different IoT devices are often unique; 3) Anti-malware software on endpoints can interfere with the operation of IoT devices; 4) The inability of first-generation, traditional firewalls and NACs to identify, classify, and contextualize IoT devices prevents effective administration of security policies; 5) Active vulnerability scanning is often disabled for the IoT assets and not used due to the fear of interference with connected device operations; and 6)Connected device firmware is not always up-to-date and security patches are not applied regularly. This Frost & Sullivan insight describes the key requirements in the Internet of Things (IoT) security market and presents details of how the leading IoT security providers address these needs. Information is provided in the form of profiles, wherein each industry participant included in this profile has been interviewed by Frost & Sullivan. Frost & Sullivan’s independent analyst perspectives have also been provided for each of the profiled companies.
Published: Jun 12 2018 Market Insights
Continued Growth of Smartphones, Mobile Computing, and M2M Communications
The North American mobile communications industry is defined by high-speed broadband services, continued penetration of advanced mobile devices, encouraging developments in cellular machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) market, and resurgence of unlimited mobile plans. The attached tracker presents mobile communication metrics for tier-I mobile operators in the United States and Canadian mobile communications market. The study also supplies statistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, equipment revenue, and service and data revenue, which also include the average voice and data revenue per user. Data for prepaid and postpaid subscribers, adoption of bundled plans, device subsidies, capital expenditure, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, and churn rates have also been provided (where available or where they can be estimated). Statistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, smartphone penetration, service and data revenue (including the average voice and data revenue per user), equipment revenue, prepaid and post paid subscribers, capital expenditures, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, churn rates (and quarterly churned users), and others are provided. Comments on important market developments, such as network shutdowns, broadband investments and initiatives, customer acquisitions and divestments, and new service initiatives are also included.
Published: May 17 2018 Tracker
Network Enhancements, Edge Computing and Advanced Network Management to Support Innovative IoT Services
5th generation (5G) wireless technologies will deliver a potent combination of network capabilities and flexible options for network deployments, service delivery, and network management. 5G deployments are envisioned as a complex amalgamation of various next-generation technological enhancements to the wireless access, transport, cloud, network applications and management layers. It will incrementally build on various 4G technologies currently deployed, thus enabling mobile operators to preserve existing investments in network infrastructure. A significant share of 5G will be deployed at very high frequencies, which has important ramifications for coverage. In order to overcome the coverage limitations at higher frequencies, 5G networks will be overlaid with “ultra-dense” access networks such as small and metro cells. The core features and functionality of 5G will eventually make their way into lower band spectrum given the need to make them ubiquitous across the US. Over-investing in 5G building blocks, including wide area and small-cell networks, spectrum, backhaul and front haul, and distributed cloud solutions can restrict the ability of operators to deliver economical 5G services. It is essential for mobile operators to establish the right strategic vendor agreements in order to ensure that they receive the best return on their investments in 5G infrastructure. This Frost & Sullivan analysis presents details of the various ways in which 5G mobile networks will support advanced Internet of Things (IoT) deployments. It describes the key features in 5G that are essential for next-generation IoT implementations and discusses the impact of 5G across the major IoT industry verticals. Key use cases for 5G IoT include Fixed Wireless Access (FWA), IoT, and improved throughputs (enhanced broadband). There will be corollary use cases that will be further enabled by the primary use cases, including smart cities, smart infrastructure, and enhanced connected living concepts. Developing new, viable pricing models to support the large number of use cases is likely to be a challenge. For example, delivering the benefits of 5G at a significantly higher cost than what customers are already used to with 4G may not be a good pricing strategy. It is also important to ensure appropriate security for IoT. As more devices become networked, the potential for security breaches expands exponentially. Not only can cybersecurity attacks cause operational disruptions, breached or malfunctioning devices can also be commandeered to launch cybersecurity attacks on other devices and systems to pose significant risks to consumers, businesses and societies. Security must be incorporated at the design phase in next-generation connected products.
Published: Apr 02 2018 Other
Continued Growth of Smartphones, Unlimited Data Plans, Mobile Data Traffic and High Speed Wireless Content Services
The North American mobile communications industry is defined by high-speed broadband services, continued penetration of advanced mobile devices, encouraging developments in cellular machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) market, and resurgence of unlimited mobile plans. The attached tracker presents mobile communication metrics for tier-I mobile operators in the United States and Canadian mobile communications market. The study also supplies statistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, equipment revenue, and service and data revenue, which also include the average voice and data revenue per user. Data for prepaid and postpaid subscribers, adoption of bundled plans, device subsidies, capital expenditure, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, and churn rates have also been provided (where available or where they can be estimated). Statistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, smartphone penetration, service and data revenue (including the average voice and data revenue per user), equipment revenue, prepaid and post paid subscribers, capital expenditures, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, churn rates (and quarterly churned users), and others are provided. Comments on important market developments, such as network shutdowns, broadband investments and initiatives, customer acquisitions and divestments, and new service initiatives are also included.
Published: Feb 15 2018 Tracker
IoT Connection to Reach 45.4 Billion in 2023
The future of Internet of Things (IoT) involves billions of connected devices (such as smartphones, computers, and sensors) communicating with one another, regardless of manufacturer, operating system, chipset, or physical transport. However, security is essential for reliable IoT operations. Whether malicious or accidental, malfunctioning IoT devices such as a connected car or components of a smart grid can pose a significant risk to consumers, businesses, and societies. Therefore, it is essential to protect IoT devices in order to realize the full potential of IoT. The key considerations for complete and effective IoT cybersecurity include: 1) Operating within the physical and technical limitations of IoT by using efficient and lightweight security technologies; 2) The ability to accommodate multiple security approaches, including digital certificate-based or certificate-less security mechanisms; 3) The protection of IoT data at rest, in transit, and in the cloud; 4) A standards-based approach for IoT security; and 5) Operating at scale to support millions of IoT devices with no impact on speed and security of IoT operations. Hardening the security posture of IoT components once the product has been deployed commercially is extremely difficult. Therefore, it is imperative that security is implemented during the device design phase or device manufacturing phase. Security costs are low compared to the potential devastation that could result from a compromising event. However, IoT devices are being manufactured without the required components essential for IoT security—such as a way to generate keys on the device or without a mechanism to configure unique identifiers to devices. Device original equipment manufacturers (OEM) must use components that have the necessary built-in security capabilities to ensure the appropriate levels of device and data authentication and integrity. Examples of built-in security functions that are essential for device security include hardware root of trust, trusted boot, trusted execution environment (TEE) for secure low-level software operations (for IoT devices that have the required computing resources), hardware-level isolation for trusted code base, and easy-to-use APIs to access low-level security functions. This Frost & Sullivan insight describes the key requirements in the Internet of Things (IoT) security market and presents details of how the leading IoT security providers address these needs. Information is provided in the form of profiles, wherein each industry participant included in this profile has been interviewed by Frost & Sullivan. Frost & Sullivan’s independent analyst perspectives have also been provided for each of the profiled companies.
Published: Jan 12 2018 Market Insights
Continued Growth of Smartphones, Unlimited Data Plans, Mobile Data Traffic and High Speed Wireless Content Services
The North American mobile communications industry is defined by high-speed broadband services, continued penetration of advanced mobile devices, encouraging developments in cellular machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) market, and resurgence of unlimited mobile plans. The attached tracker presents mobile communication metrics for tier-I mobile operators in the United States and Canadian mobile communications market. The study also supplies statistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, equipment revenue, and service and data revenue, which also include the average voice and data revenue per user. Data for prepaid and postpaid subscribers, adoption of bundled plans, device subsidies, capital expenditure, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, and churn rates have also been provided (where available or where they can be estimated). Statistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, smartphone penetration, service and data revenue (including the average voice and data revenue per user), equipment revenue, prepaid and post paid subscribers, capital expenditures, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, churn rates (and quarterly churned users), and others are provided. Comments on important market developments, such as network shutdowns, broadband investments and initiatives, customer acquisitions and divestments, and new service initiatives are also included.
Published: Nov 29 2017 Tracker
Increasing Cybersecurity Threats Attract New Vendors and Drive Growth
The increased proliferation of hyper connectivity exposes industrial control system (ICS) endpoints to new cybersecurity threats. According to the Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT), ICS attacks have increased substantially in the United States between 2010 and 2016 (ICS-CERT Year in Review 2016 report). While both external and internal threats are on the rise, internal security threats make up the majority of security threats in ICS environments. In addition to disgruntled employees launching internal security attacks, an improperly configured industrial asset can lead to the same impact as a malicious attack. Therefore, ensuring all deployed IT and production-centric assets are properly configured and operating as intended at all times is critical. According to the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), the leading global industry association for Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), the average life span of an industrial system is currently 19 years, meaning that security technologies must be compatible with legacy operational technology (OT) systems that may simply not be designed to support present-day security mechanisms. Ideally, security must be applied from the edge to the cloud and should span informational technology (IT) and OT networks and sub systems. Security is essential for reliable operations of IoT. Whether malicious or accidental, malfunctioning IoT devices, such as connected cars and smart grid components, can pose a significant risk to consumers, businesses, and societies. Frost & Sullivan’s research indicates that more than 70% of organizations today believe security is a top consideration in IoT purchase decisions. These outfits expect security will emerge as the top consideration for more than 90% of customers by 2020. IoT devices typically have only as much processing capacity and memory as needed for their tasks. Therefore, IoT must be secured by using efficient technologies that are purposely built for the machine environment. Secure device onboarding and implementing owner-controlled security credentials on devices are the foundational requirements for IoT security. Security costs are low compared to the potential devastation from a compromising event; however, IoT devices are being manufactured without the required components essential for IoT security, such as a way to generate keys on the device or without a mechanism to configure unique identifiers to devices. Device original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) must use components that have the necessary in-built security capabilities to ensure appropriate levels of device and data authentication and integrity. This Frost & Sullivan insight describes the key requirements in the ICS security market and presents details on how leading security providers address these needs. Information is provided in the form of profiles, wherein Frost & Sullivan has interviewed each industry participant included in this profile. Frost & Sullivan’s independent analyst perspectives have been provided for each profiled companies as well.
Published: Oct 25 2017 Other
Mobile Video to Contribute 80% to Mobile Data Traffic in the United States by 2022
Video content consumes the highest amount of wireless bandwidth for the Tier I mobile operators in the United States. Globally, mobile video traffic makes up nearly 55% of total mobile data traffic and this figure is expected to increase to 75% by 2022. Apart from mobile video content services and peer-to-peer video communication applications, mobile video-based Internet of Things (IoT) applications such as in-vehicle entertainment systems, security systems, and remote patient monitoring are also increasingly contributing to cellular video data traffic. The key trends in mobile video that are shaping operator strategies for rich media include: 1) strong growth of Web TV; 2) resurgence of advertising free premium content and services; 3) consumer expectations for anytime, anywhere mobile video content; and 4) ecosystem complexities. Mobile operators are increasingly relying on video to generate premium content and counter the effects of a slowdown in their core connectivity businesses. Their foray into custom content puts them in competition with the established content providers that have mastered the art of producing content tailored to the different consumer segments. However, mobile operators have several unique assets that can help them deliver a differentiated content and services experience, including established billing relationships, Big Data assets that can help deliver targeted advertising, and the ability to offer integrated service bundles to consumers. The proliferation of unlimited mobile plans is a clear driver for the growth of the US mobile video services market. Despite the near-ubiquity of Wi-Fi services in the United States, a significant amount of mobile video consumption still takes place over cellular networks. Unlimited mobile plans, with included bundles of mobile video services, support the need of consumers to view video content when mobile without having to incur higher amounts of mobile service charges. Advancements in content codec formats, increased network efficiency, intelligent network traffic management, and customer experience enhancement strategies further help support the trend of mobile video traffic growth. This Frost & Sullivan insight presents details of the mobile video strategies of the Tier I mobile operators in the United States. It details how the proliferation of connected devices and the introduction of unlimited mobile service plans support mobile video content consumption. This insight also discusses the service strategies of leading mobile operators that offer integrated telecommunications solutions consisting of fixed and mobile video content services. Throughout this insight, the terms operators, mobile operators, and service providers are used interchangeably.
Published: Sep 25 2017 Other
Continued Growth of Smartphones, Unlimited Data Plans, Mobile Data Traffic and High Speed Wireless Content Services
The attached tracker presents mobile communication metrics for tier-I mobile operators in the United States and Canadian mobile communications market. The study also supplies statistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, equipment revenue, and service and data revenue, which also include the average voice and data revenue per user. Data for prepaid and postpaid subscribers, capital expenditure, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, and churn rates have also been providedstatistics on mobile subscribers, connected devices, smartphone penetration, service and data revenue (including the average voice and data revenue per user), equipment revenue, prepaid and post paid subscribers, capital expenditures, minutes of usage, cost per gross addition, cash cost per user, churn rates (and quarterly churned users), and others are provided.
Published: Aug 22 2017 Tracker
90% of Organizations to Consider Security as the Prime Consideration in IoT Deployments
The future of Internet of Things (IoT) involves billions of connected devices (such as smartphones, computers, and sensors) communicating with one another, regardless of manufacturer, operating system, chipset, or physical transport. However, security is essential for reliable IoT operations. Whether malicious or accidental, malfunctioning IoT devices such as a connected car or components of a smart grid can pose a significant risk to consumers, businesses, and societies. Therefore, it is essential to protect IoT devices in order to realize the full potential of IoT. The key considerations for complete and effective IoT cybersecurity include: 1) Operating within the physical and technical limitations of IoT by using efficient and lightweight security technologies; 2) The ability to accommodate multiple security approaches, including digital certificate-based or certificate-less security mechanisms; 3) The protection of IoT data at rest, in transit, and in the cloud; 4) A standards-based approach for IoT security; and 5) Operating at scale to support millions of IoT devices with no impact on speed and security of IoT operations. Hardening the security posture of IoT components once the product has been deployed commercially is extremely difficult. Therefore, it is imperative that security is implemented during the device design phase or device manufacturing phase. Security costs are low compared to the potential devastation that could result from a compromising event. However, IoT devices are being manufactured without the required components essential for IoT security—such as a way to generate keys on the device or without a mechanism to configure unique identifiers to devices. Device original equipment manufacturers (OEM) must use components that have the necessary built in security capabilities to ensure the appropriate levels of device and data authentication and integrity. Examples of built in security functions that are essential for device security include hardware root of trust, trusted boot, trusted execution environment (TEE) for secure low-level software operations (for IoT devices that have the required computing resources), hardware-level isolation for trusted code base, and easy-to-use APIs to access low-level security functions. This Frost & Sullivan insight describes the key requirements in the Internet of Things (IoT) security market and presents details of how the leading IoT security providers address these needs. Information is provided in the form of profiles, wherein each industry participant included in this profile has been interviewed by Frost & Sullivan. Frost & Sullivan’s independent analyst perspectives have also been provided for each of the profiled companies.
Published: Jun 20 2017 Other
Background M2M and IoT System Integrators (SIs) integrate various technologies and component platforms to develop and manage connected solutions. Their primary task is to ensure that various hardware and software pieces work together as intended, and the deployed M2M and IoT solutions meet the end customers' specific set of requirements. SIs can a...
07 Jul 2015 Blog post
Brand Challenges   Brand advertisers want to reach the right audience with the right message at the right time, regardless of whether they are viewing content on their TVs, PC, tablets, or mobile phones. However, there are several barriers that exist today in the digital, multi-screen advertising marketplace. These include 1) barriers between dif...
27 Jan 2015 Blog post
Introduction   Adoption of cloud-based machine-to-machine (M2M) and Internet-of-Things (IoT) application lifecycle management platforms is expected to increase rapidly in the United States.  By providing access to a standard set of published interfaces or application programming interfaces (APIs) & Vertical market templates, M2M/IoT cloud platfor...
25 Jul 2014 Blog post
Introduction to Mobile Application Reputation Services   Frost & Sullivan research confirms that the North American Enterprise Mobility market is on a growth trajectory. The number of organizations that consider mobility as a key business enabler continues to increase rapidly. However, managing the device is only the first step – it is equally im...
20 Mar 2014 Blog post
Next-generation mobile protection helps consumers protect, manage, optimize, and enhance their mobile device, mobile data assets, and the overall mobile customer experience. In this article, Frost & Sullivan will highlight the important benefits of next-generation mobile protection for carriers, and explain how carriers can generate long-term custo...
07 Nov 2013 Blog post
  An average smartphone user in the United States now consumes nearly 2 gigabyte (GB) of cellular data every month and spends upwards of 120 minutes on his or her mobile phone every day. With smartphones gradually becoming the primary device for content consumption and creation, the need to protect, support, manage, and optimize the overall mobile...
28 Oct 2013 Blog post
The evolution from basic features phones to smartphones has been nothing short of phenomenal. Advancements in network and device technologies, coupled with the proliferation of sophisticated applications, continue to aggressively drive data consumption on mobile devices. In fact, Frost & Sullivan research indicates the average smartphone user in th...
20 Aug 2013 Blog post
Introduction The mobile Internet revolution has led to dramatic growth in emerging connected devices. Frost & Sullivan expects mobile computing form factors, such as connected laptops, netbooks, notebooks, tablets, and wireless hotspots to increase to 50 million by 2017 in North America, while total cellular M2M connections are expected to increas...
24 Jun 2013 Blog post
In previous blogs on Mobile Advertising, Frost & Sullivan has highlighted three distinct business models: 1)      The Network Model 2)      The Direct Sales Model 3)      The Programmatic Model The Programmatic Model is expected to become quite popular in the next 12-18 months and is based on mediation and real-time bidding (RTB) solutions. Med...
14 Nov 2012 Blog post
In a recently released Frost & Sullivan report, “Efforts of Independent M2M Service Providers and M2M MVNOs” was highlighted as one of the key drivers in the North American M2M communications market. While it is true that leading mobile operators have committed a significant amount of resources (platforms, processes, and people) for M2M, they may f...
26 Aug 2012 Blog post
Introduction The importance of cloud-based M2M platforms cannot be overstated. The "Internet of Things" (IOT) will be comprised of billions of connected devices across numerous verticals. Cellular wide-area networks (WAN) will play an important role in providing connectivity "either directly or indirectly" to a good portion of the devices that mak...
06 Aug 2012 Blog post
In my previous blog, we talked about the history of mobile advertising, and how simple banner ads served on WAP phones gave way to rich media advertising served within mobile Internet, application and video environments in mobile. In this piece, I wanted to talk about Private Mobile Ad Exchanges(Private Exchanges), which are likely to become extrem...
02 Apr 2012 Blog post
With the recent $321 million acquisition of Amobee by SingTel, mobile advertising has one again been in the news. Let’s explore the history a bit to understand how mobile advertising became a multi-billion dollar opportunity (and valuations of mobile advertising companies increased so dramatically). Frost & Sullivan has tracked the Global mobile ad...
15 Mar 2012 Blog post
NFC-based contactless mobile payments is clearly one of the most exciting opportunities in the global mobile financial services markets.  NFC-based mobile payment services (such as Google Wallet) have already been introduced in the United States, with several other initiatives (such as Isis) expected to roll out in 2012 and 2013. The mobile phone m...
30 Jan 2012 Blog post
  This year I visited several companies in the CTIA M2M zone, where we talked about some of the key developments in the machine to machine (M2M) space.  M2M has been around for a long time – connected machines have been supported over 1G technologies such as Cellular Digital Packet Data (CDPD) in the United States for more than ten years now. Howe...
06 Apr 2011 Blog post
Much has already been written about the Google-AdMob and Apple-Quattro Wireless deals and how they will accelerate the pace of innovation in mobile advertising. In both cases, a larger organization with relevant assets in mobile content and advertising has declared its intent to acquire a smaller, innovative mobile advertising company to 1) shorten...
10 May 2010 Blog post

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